Hard truths vs. hopeful lies

Posted: July 25, 2013 in Evangelism, Leadership, Life, love, Me and God, Me and people, Parenting, The Bible, The Church
Tags: , , ,

Sometimes Christianity is easier said than done. The ‘rubber’ is easy when we tweet the Bible verse, or propose to do this, or “from now on” not to do that, in order to please God. However the ‘meeting the road’ becomes a bit more complicated when it comes to applying those intentions to real practical daily life. Telling the truth is one of those areas I’ve been struggling with.

See, we know as Christians that we are to tell the truth always. In fact, we know that lying is an abomination and hated by God. It’s been said that there are “white lies” –mind you, this is said by people, never by God. But what to do when the hard truth can be, too hard? Too difficult to handle? Too politically incorrect?

With my kids: There are easy truthful answers to easy questions:

Q: “do you love me?; A:“yes”
Q: “does God still love me”; A: “Yes!”

But what about the questions to which answers I don’t know, or know to be completely, likely, or at least remotely, hard?:

Q: “Is it going to rain?”
Q: “will a tornado hit our neighborhood?”
Q: “will our sick pet survive the accident?
Q: “is my uncle Ben going to heaven?”

Do I give the ‘hopeful’ nice answer? (“yes, he is in heaven in spite of rejecting Christ”), or do I give the truth?: “the statistical chances of a tornado hitting our neighborhood –or our house, are so remote, that we don’t need to worry about it”. You may thing its funny or pathetic. However, this answer about the tornadoes is what I gave to my kids –perhaps in a moment of lack of judgment, and ever since, they freak out every time there is a little bit of rain in the forecast. Now I wonder if perhaps I should have said: “a tornado will never hit our neighborhood!”. And what if it does? What if the sick pet ends up dying? Will I then lose credibility in their eyes and doubt therefore that God loves them? What would the right answer be?

With adults and other believers: Let’s say that a friend of mine posts a Facebook status about a stranger making comments about how bad of a parent he is because he is feeding his kids with chips and soda and letting them run wild. He states, “Am I that bad of a parent?, I’m doing the best I can with all the stress of losing my house and all” To this, friends start commenting: “don’t listen to them, you are doing a great job”, or “you are a great parent!”, “you lost your house because we live in an unjust society”.

Do I go with the flow and say “you’re great, keep on doing what you’re doing!” or, do I address the fact that from my point of view, his overweight kids maybe at risk eating so unhealthy; that his kids are indeed out of control and need some boundaries and discipline; and that losing his house may have less to do with an unjust society and more to do with his unwise investments and decisions in the past? As a friend, I would want to help in his situation. In fact, I would hope my friends would call me up on areas they see I am failing and help me by pointing out my mistakes. It has happened, and I have and still appreciate that honesty. What would the right answer be?

With non-believers: A typical scenario would be when a very good person who happens to be a relative, a great friend, nice neighbor, involved citizen and concerned for the poor, is engaged and resolved to live a lifestyle that shows disobedience to clear Biblical principles and commands. Then they ask: “why can you accept, respect and support my lifestyle and personal decisions? Doesn’t God love me? Why not you?”. As Christians, do we do better by giving them a hug, inviting them to lunch and agreeing that God loves them (which is true) and expressing support for their lifestyles, and keeping “the relationship door open”? Or do we tell what we think to be the Biblical stand; that although God loves them, as He does anybody else, there are guidelines and consequences, and whatever else maybe appropriate to the situation? (along with the hug and lunch). Do we risk losing the relationship and being labeled as hater or judgmental or intolerant? If whatever words I utter, somehow misguide his perception and God’s view of the situation, and gives him a false confidence that ultimately can drive him to an eternal mistake –and painful consequences on earth, wouldn’t I be acting selfishly in not telling the truth? What would the right answer be?

Is telling the truth a relative subjective concept to be handled on a case-by-case basis?
Am I missing something?

 

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Comments
  1. Angela says:

    How about the number one questions from wives? “Do I look fat in this dress?” Honesty can be dangerous… (:

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